Sworn translation

Accreditation for purposes of becoming a sworn translator

Being tested and found competent is the first step in becoming a sworn translator. Candidates often experience difficulty finding an appropriately qualified person who is prepared to test them. Also, the Rules Board has not given any guidelines on what the testing should comprise, which means that some sworn translators have never proved their competence specifically in the types of documentation they are most often called upon to translate.

 ;

SATI therefore introduced an exam as part of its accreditation system that tests candidates specifically for purposes of becoming a sworn translator. This means they do not need to find another examiner, that they are tested on the type of material they will encounter in their practice as a sworn translator and that they can use this accreditation to gain voting rights within the Institute.

 ;

The accreditation exam is run on the same principles as that for general translation. The differences are as follows:

  • The texts are of the types that sworn translators are most commonly required to translate.
  • Candidates have to translate all the texts in the paper.
  • There may be more texts in the paper than for general translation.
  • There are certain additional errors that might not be considered in general accreditation.
  • The marking is stricter, i.e. fewer errors are allowed.
  • Candidates are required to show that they are familiar with the conventions related to sworn translation.
  • The exam cannot be returned electronically, as candidates are required to sign and certify the translations as if they were true sworn translations.

 ;

The Institute has published a manual on sworn translation that elucidates the various conventions and requirements. This is the basis against which exams are assessed. Candidates are strongly advised to study the manual before attempting the exam. Details on the manual can be found on the Publications page of this Website.

 ;

Assessment

The major and minor errors used for assessing sworn translation are defined as follows:

  • Major errors: Gross mistranslation, in which the meaning of the word/phrase in the original text is lost altogether omission of vital words or other information insertion of information not contained in the original (except in the case of translator's notes) inclusion of alternate translations, where the translator should have made a choice any important failure in target-language grammar misspelling of names of persons or places or reference numbers miscopying of a date and failure to certify at all, as without certification the document is useless.
  • Minor errors: Mistranslation that distorts somewhat, but does not wholly falsify, the intent of the original omission of words that contribute only slightly to meaning presentation of alternate translations where the terms offered are synonymous or nearly so `inelegance' in target language grammar typographical errors and failure to certify every page.

 ;

To pass the exam a candidate must have:

  • No more than eight minor errors in the exam as a whole
  • No more than four minor errors in any one text
  • No more than one major error in the exam as a whole
  • No more than three minor errors in a text that contains a major error

 ;

Two major errors in one text, or one major error and four minor errors in one text, means that one fails the examination as a whole.

 ;

Candidates are penalised only once for major errors of a technical nature, such as failure to certify.

 ;

Marking

Marking of examination scripts takes place in the same way as for general translation. Where possible, sworn translators are used as markers.

 ;

Procedure

The procedure for accreditation exams for purposes of becoming a sworn translator are the same as for general translation, except that the translations cannot be submitted electronically. Please consult the Accreditation > Translation page on this Website for details.

 ;

Results

The marking process may unfortunately take several months, as markers are not always readily available. Results are conveyed to candidates by e-mail or post as soon as practicable.

 ;

Candidates who pass are issued with a certificate indicating the details of their accreditation and may then use the appropriate abbreviations behind their name to indicate their professional accredited status.

 ;

In the case of accreditation for purposes of becoming a sworn translator the candidate also receives a certificate as required for the documentation to be handed in at court when they are sworn in, and a pro forma set of the documentation required for the court proceedings. Candidates must arrange to be sworn in within six months of passing the exam.

 ;

Further information

Go to The Profession > Sworn translation for more information about sworn translation.

Go to Accreditation > Translation for more information on the format of the translation accreditation exam.

Go to Publications for more information on the manual on sworn translation.

Sign into the Members Only area and then go to Accreditation > Application forms for an application form for an exam.

Any queries can be directed to the SATI office.

 ;

 ;

Links

Overview of sworn translation accreditation 2016 (pptx) (1.6 MB)

Overview of sworn translation accreditation 2016 (pdf) (4 MB)


    

MODE:
ENGLISH


 
 

 < Accreditation

 
TPolar Design Solutions © 2007 The South African Translators' Institute
                    Best viewed at 800x600